# Friday, 01 July 2005

It feels great to finally be back from our long June vacation back to the mid-west to spread the word about this monumental academic achievement. Oregon Tech truly has given me height for my level of skill with programming, and I know I can carry this with me like I mentioned in my commencement address “for the rest of my life,” as expected of me with the talents I’ve always had, and until now have been able to almost fully develop.

The two people I still owe a huge debt to for sticking with me through all the tough times with at home project dead lines, Jill my beautiful wife, and Jay Bockelman the Oregon Tech Portland, Software Engineering Program Director. I could not have asked for a better friend and mentor through over two years of a Mentor/Pier relationship as we walked through the whole software conception, design, development, and testing iteratively driven development process not once, but twice! Here are the two best photographs that captured these moments in time:

The Official Senior Project Completion Hand ShakeBest picture of Jill with myself holding the new Degree with Jay Bockelman

Of course none of the above exceptional moments in time would have been possible if it weren’t for the most software and logic puzzle project anyone may have conceived: The 3–Dimensional Hidden Word Puzzle Generator and Solver Ultimate Project: The Puzzler – 3D Style! Maybe some day, in a later version, this will also have the ultimate 3–Dimensional Hidden Word Cube Puzzle Displayer as well. In other words, actually use another 3D render technology some day such as OpenGL or FLASH! to make the cube more visible.

Here are my favorite senior project exposition photographs:

Another Look at my Senior Project Setup and Presentation

Showing Off Senior Project with my Wife - Jill FeyerhermMy Wife - Jill Feyerherm Proudly Displaying Over an entire YEAR Worth of Blood, Sweat, Trial and Error, and Months Worth of Tears

The entire endeavour took just slightly over a year to conceive the idea of, design from scratch, build, test, document, and release for the exposition. The binder itself is a little of a thousand five hundred (1,500) pages of original design notes, testing material, and documentation (all of which amounted to about two thirds (2/3) of the binder’s volume). The remaining third of the binder was code all done with .NET technologies.

For all of you who I did not name, and you most definitely know who you are, I thank you and appreciate you for helping to advance my software engineering career.

Friday, 01 July 2005 19:23:15 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Monday, 13 June 2005

I know I must have said this over again too many times for the people close to me in my life:

That designing, building, and fully testing The Puzzler - 3D Style Challenge has been the hardest, and most memorable temporary undertaking I've ever done in my entire life.

The entire project itself took the entire YEAR to conceive, define, design, layout, build, and fully tested with documented results from DAY ONE! Anyone who knows me understands who much time I had to put into this project on a regular and extremely predictive daily basis.

I'm very thankful to say that everything I defined and set out to do for this massive undertaking is completely finished and tested 100%. For the group of seniors I'm graduating with today for software engineering under Jay Bockelman, this was very unusual since only about half actually finished their projects they were working on in the time alloted.

And quite frankly, the "finishing with in the planned amount of time" should as IS the critical part for any professional software engineer in my humble opinion.

Monday, 13 June 2005 22:03:29 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 13 May 2005

This have really gotten interesting on the data base back end of the application. With the database being itself at a remote location, web services was the natural answer to the “How am I going to get my data over there?” question.

To no surprise of my own, the maximum size of a SOAP message that may be passed is 4 megs by default in the machine.config spec file for my .NET 1.1 framework I'm working with. Personally I don't see why any of this should change in 2.0 when folks (like myself can just override that specification in their own web.config specification file for what ever their application needs to do.)

Just for yucks, I'm increasing the default to 256 megs and seeing how much hang time I can get while passing the HUGE objects generated by the Puzzler's output.

<httpRuntime executionTimeout="180" maxRequestLength="262144" minFreeThreads="26" minLocalRequestFreeThreads="13" />

Notice how the minimum number of free local threads was also increased from 8 to 13 for solving all 26 directional possibilities of the puzzle (One thread cover one bi-directional possibility within the puzzle).

Friday, 13 May 2005 22:55:21 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Wednesday, 27 April 2005

For my senior project still in progress, "The Puzzler - 3D Style," .NET multi-threading has played a CRITICAL role in shaving off additional mintues that the Solution Algorithm is taking to come up with finished final results for a three dimentional puzzle of variable size. On the average, up to four mintues is being saved for a 25x25x25 randomly generated puzzle.

The power of .NET muti-threading support for algorithm enhancement, pass it it on!

foreach( Thread trailingThread in solutionThreads )
{
     trailingThread.IsBackgroundThread = true;
     trailingThread.Priority = ThreadPriority.AboveNormal;
     trailingThread.Start();
}

foreach( Thread trailingThread in solutionThreads )
     while( trailingThread.IsAlive );

Wednesday, 27 April 2005 17:34:00 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 25 March 2005

I never met a heavy weight build script interpreter I didn't like. Quike frankly, that goes with out saying for NAnt. My first try at using NAnt with my senior project, “The Puzzler - 3D Style” whos current beta parts are listed here for anyone that care to inspect.

I was very surprised with just how quickly I was able to take off with using NAnt builder by just using my .sln and .proj files autogenerated by VS.NET 2003. This is a very simplified use of NAnt starting out, but just by looking at it, it's easy to tell just how complex such a build script with NAnt can get...

That batch file build.bat executes two lines:
NAnt.exe -l:build.log.txt clean build
start /B /I NOTEPAD.EXE build.log.txt

This then executes the build script xml document:

<?xml version="1.0" ?>
<project name="The Puzzler - 3D Style" default="build" basedir=".">
      <description>The Puzzler - 3D Style build files.</description>
      <property name="debug" value="true" overwrite="false" />
      <target name="clean" description="Removes all files outputed from the previous build on The Puzzler - 3D Style.">
            <delete failonerror="false" >
                  <fileset>
                        <include name="**\*.dll" if="true" /> <!-- Removes all generated assemblies -->
                        <include name="**\*.xml" if="true" /> <!-- Removes all documentation xml files -->
                  </fileset>
            </delete>
      </target>
      <target name="build" description="Complies my source code for The Puzzler - 3D Style from the original solution file generated by VS.NET 2003.">
            <solution verbose="true" configuration="debug" solutionfile="thepuzzler_3dstyle.sln">
                  <webmap>
                        <map url="http://localhost/thepuzzler_3dstyle/thepuzzler_3dstyle_localhost.csproj" path="C:\Documents and Settings\Nostro\VSWebCache\matthew.klump-pdx.com\thepuzzler_3dstyle\thepuzzler_3dstyle_localhost.csproj" />
                  </webmap>
            </solution>
            <solution verbose="true" configuration="release" solutionfile="thepuzzler_3dstyle.sln">
                  <webmap>
                        <map url="http://localhost/thepuzzler_3dstyle/thepuzzler_3dstyle_localhost.csproj" path="C:\Documents and Settings\Nostro\VSWebCache\matthew.klump-pdx.com\thepuzzler_3dstyle\thepuzzler_3dstyle_localhost.csproj" />
                  </webmap>
            </solution>
      </target>
</project>

Friday, 25 March 2005 07:24:57 UTC  #    Comments [1]Trackback
# Thursday, 17 March 2005

I absolutely had to blog about this! As you all know, Scott Hanselman was recently published in the OIT Alumni's magazine. This is an outstanding story of Scott's life and career at Corillian Corp and can be read here. I must agree that the photography is quite remarkable! The artist's name is Laszlo Bencze, and his handy work can be look at on his website here.

Scott's thoughts about being an honored OIT alumni is posted here.

But that's not the point of this blog entry. Little did I know that for the last week I've been carrying around in my pocket an invitation to the 3rd Annual OIT Alumni Awards Banquet with guess who as the “Master of Ceremonies,” none other than himself in the flesh Scott Hanselman!

Needless to say that when I finally read this last line at the bottom of the invitation, I was litterally blow away, and logged on immediately to get this posted! I may be taking time away from my CST 415 Computer Networking final exam that I owe for Sean Hefty today, but this simply could not wait...

And Sean, if you reading this you can rest assured that all is in good hands with that exam. :)

Such an honor...!

Thursday, 17 March 2005 19:36:00 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Wednesday, 09 March 2005

One of the people that have I've had the honor of taking seminar classes with, and instrumental in helping with the scope of The Puzzler - 3d Style senior project is Rich Claussen!

Rich along with Scott Hanselman, Jay Bockelman, and Sean hefty have all been instrumental in providing me with much needed critique/feed back about the senior project code and ASP.NET web-based UI useability. Without there observations and ideas, I would not have made it as far as I have with this 3D version of Scott's 2D puzzler final project every one gets to do at the end of his C# with .NET class.

Here's a shot of us taking in some much needed instruction at Patrick Cauldwell's Applied Web Services CST407 seminar:

Wednesday, 09 March 2005 21:46:08 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Thursday, 06 January 2005

A good friend, and the best technical Ally, Scott Hansellman, was graciously generous to help he out of an IIS web app debloyment blowout.

The snag: Having two virtual directories point to the same physical directory on the webserver machine, and then changing the access rights for the aspnet_wp.exe script executer thinking would fix the problem.

The solution: Eliminating the duplicate vdir by checking the process model in mahcine.config, then execute aspnet_regiis.exe -i, and then iisreset.exe.

Extra cudos to Scott for helping to run these steps that resulted in getting The Puzzler - 3D Style back underway without the senior project schedule slipping.

Side comment about blog shares: I sort of like the idea of getting “blog credits” for linking out to places like blog shares to promote the idea of getting people to post more of their public lives online. I haven't gotten a whole lot of credits, but I'm sure that will increast in the coming years.

Thursday, 06 January 2005 14:27:15 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Wednesday, 08 December 2004

I ran into a bit of an issue today regarding the MS SQL Sever 2000 NT Service not successfully starting (over and over) after I had change the Administrator account's password. This, of course, became abundantly clear after checking the system event log.

Some how, I don't know why yet without doing further research on msdn, this also changed the logon for the MSSQLSERVER service in the services administration snapin.

Of course this was immediately remedied by changing the service log on back to the local system account instead of the administrator's account. How it got that way, I still have no clue without more research. If any one reading this has any ideas as to what would cause this, please do leave a comment, or email --> matthew@klump-pdx.com. Thanks everyone!

Wednesday, 08 December 2004 22:40:40 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 19 November 2004

Today I solved a major snag that's bugged me for serveral weeks. Although it was cool being able to finally plug my cell phone to my pc for internet, that nothing compared to not having the correct info to set up rights for remote development.

Well after today, that has all changed. After reading some fairly important msdn articles here, I found the rather important fact that all remote developers must have accounts on the web server in question, and if it is a Windows box, everyone must be added to the VS_Developers local machine users group. If you've ever had a similar experience, would you please send me an email or post a comment? Thanks!

Friday, 19 November 2004 06:15:09 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Tuesday, 02 November 2004

At this point I am discontinuing my project event logging on this sight for the sake of security. I will definitly continue to post for cool stuff going on like having dressed up like my favorite “Rings” character “Aragon Son of Arathorn,” and Jill going as “Arawin Daughter of Elrond.” Pics to be posted soon...

Tuesday, 02 November 2004 20:09:21 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Wednesday, 27 October 2004

For today, I finished rewriting the introduction for Iteration 1 correctly. This explains what I hope to have done by next Tuesday's dead line. It seems as though my to-do list has quadrupled over night...

Wednesday, 27 October 2004 23:39:37 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 22 October 2004

For the design session, I flushed out some more details by creating a stratospheric view document that describes the over all actions and interactions going on in my project. This use case visio diagram further describes all the actors and systems external to my project that have a remote possibility (and within the scope/domian) of interacting with this project as well as use case situations going inside the system/project.

Friday, 22 October 2004 21:04:05 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Sunday, 17 October 2004

Today in the laboratory for senior project at OIT Portland, I had a fantastic experience with Jay Bockelman (See Picture of us Below) exploring and visually diagramming some high level modularized ideas for building "The Puzzler - 3D Style."


The digital record of our notes is available here for download (photo images). Use cases are just about complete and will be ready for inspection by the Due Date on Tuesday, October 19, 2004. Come back and visit for more details about this evolving project inspired by Scott Hanselman.

Sunday, 17 October 2004 04:39:59 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 24 September 2004

I can personally attest that Rory and Scott's presentation did not suck. Far from it! The best I got out of it was the new concept of the Provider Pattern for ASP.NET 2.0 Beta. During the swag competition, I was fortunate enough to get a copy of the ASP.NET 2.0 Beta guide book.

Of course after having gotten the book the first thing I did was to lookup “Provider Pattern” for the detailed info (I realize I could have done it online but this was so much more fun!).

Some other gold nuggets I found was the concept of a “Master Page“, and a complete chapter dedicated to just “Data Binding.“ Check out the new ASP.NET! I think you'll really like what you see.

 

Friday, 24 September 2004 21:08:53 UTC  #    Comments [0]Trackback
# Friday, 20 August 2004

For any one that has the time or the inclenation (without violating licensing) to try porting your group's own custom software package to your own hardware.

In the case of Owl Eval, that is exactly what I did! Over the last week I spent several says going through the process of porting the Owl Eval php/mysql web app running at the time on an Apache web server on top on Linux to my Windows box at home which is a Pentium 4 3.2Ghz 1Gig Ram running Windows XP Pro with IIS 5.1 web server with a PHP/MYSQL plugin.

I must say this was not a trivial matter! Fixing the broken link references form the old site was the most grueling espcially the documentation to say the least. But please check it out here, and tell me how well I ported things compared to the old site.

Friday, 20 August 2004 22:43:43 UTC  #    Comments [2]Trackback
# Saturday, 07 August 2004

Hey there guys, as I'm sure you can well tell that Mateo's blog is finally up, running, and ready for your comments!

With senior project getting under way I have lots of questions so please visit often to my blog to help Mateo answer all kinds of questions regarding life, programming, .NET, and web services.

Extra kudos to Scott Hanselman, Rich Claussen, Jim Blizzard, Jay Bockelman, as well as all the OIT Staff for helping me to get this far with my programming career. With you all, none of this would be possible!

Thank you so much to you all, and please come visit often!

Saturday, 07 August 2004 16:12:54 UTC  #    Comments [6]Trackback